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  #1  
Old May 14th, 2015, 08:03 AM
PeaceSeeker PeaceSeeker is offline
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English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Lot of proverbs/idioms have their equivalent is most languages.

But sometimes it is difficult to find an suitable equivalent.

What is the English equivalent of "Ek to karela upar se neem chadha"?

Please feel free to add your questions/answers.
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  #2  
Old May 14th, 2015, 08:40 AM
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

More often I noticed these are mere translations rather than being equivalents. Angrez log haven't heard of karela forget the proverb.
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Old May 14th, 2015, 08:49 AM
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by sarv_shaktimaan View Post
More often I noticed these are mere translations rather than being equivalents. Angrez log haven't heard of karela forget the proverb.
Many do have good equivalents don't you think?

Examples:

It's no use crying over spilled milk = अब पछताए होत क्या जब चिड़िया चुग गई खेत
जिस की लाठी उस की भैंस = Might is right.
दूर के ढोल सुहावने लगते हैं = The grass is always greener on the other side.
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Old May 14th, 2015, 09:05 AM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
Lot of proverbs/idioms have their equivalent is most languages.

But sometimes it is difficult to find an suitable equivalent.

What is the English equivalent of "Ek to karela upar se neem chadha"?

Please feel free to add your questions/answers.
doosare hindi similars are,..

Ek toh Kodh,.. upar se khujali !

Ek toh bandar,.. upar se daru paayo !


English is " Another nail in the coffin " Ek toh aadami mar huaa toh thaa hi,.. upar se ek aur khilla thoka gaya !

When it rains,.. it pours !

When sorrows come, they come not single spies. But in battalions

.

Last edited by Jagmohan; May 14th, 2015 at 09:43 AM.
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  #5  
Old May 14th, 2015, 09:24 AM
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
Lot of proverbs/idioms have their equivalent is most languages.

But sometimes it is difficult to find an suitable equivalent.

What is the English equivalent of "Ek to karela upar se neem chadha"?

Please feel free to add your questions/answers.
The closest I can think of is "too bitter to swallow" but that is more like an interpretation than an equivalent. Maybe "truth is always bitter" can be an equivalent. I have never heard the karela idiom used... so if you presented some examples of its usage... that can help
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  #6  
Old May 14th, 2015, 09:27 AM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

anyone knows English equivalents of,...

1. सौ सोनार की, एक लोहार की (Hindi)

Transliteration: Sau sunar ki, ek lauhar ki
Literal: A single blow of a blacksmith is equal to a hundred blows of a goldsmith.

What is the best English Idiom which conveys same meaning as above?

Another one is,

2. नौ सौ चूहे खाके बिल्ली हज को चली (Hindi)

Transliteration: Nau sau chuhe khake billi haj ko chali
Literal: After eating 900 hundred rats, the cat goes to Hajj
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  #7  
Old May 14th, 2015, 09:46 AM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sane Less View Post
The closest I can think of is "too bitter to swallow" but that is more like an interpretation than an equivalent. Maybe "truth is always bitter" can be an equivalent. I have never heard the karela idiom used... so if you presented some examples of its usage... that can help

^ You missed it totally.

The sense is,..
ek toh aadami already boora toh thaa hi,....
and, you even tried to give it a more raise/lift/elevation/boost in that direction, to add it more to it / increase its intensity, of its evilness.

( Ek toh Bandar thaa,.. and already, iis ped se uus ped pe, jump/chhalaang maar raha thaa,.. tum ne, upar se use daaru pilaayo ! )

.

Last edited by Jagmohan; May 14th, 2015 at 10:09 AM.
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Old May 15th, 2015, 08:06 AM
PeaceSeeker PeaceSeeker is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sane Less View Post
The closest I can think of is "too bitter to swallow" but that is more like an interpretation than an equivalent. Maybe "truth is always bitter" can be an equivalent. I have never heard the karela idiom used... so if you presented some examples of its usage... that can help
It is like saying: "As if X was not bad enough, Y has happened too".

Background: Karela is already kadwa (bitter). Supposedly, if the creeper is on top of neem tree (neem is kadwa too), the result is a more kadwa karela (bitterer gourd).

Now show me what you got..
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  #9  
Old May 15th, 2015, 08:11 AM
PeaceSeeker PeaceSeeker is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Jagmohan,

Pls dont post cutted-pasted chapters. I guess you REALLY need to learn the ropes
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  #10  
Old May 15th, 2015, 09:44 AM
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
It is like saying: "As if X was not bad enough, Y has happened too".

Background: Karela is already kadwa (bitter). Supposedly, if the creeper is on top of neem tree (neem is kadwa too), the result is a more kadwa karela (bitterer gourd).

Now show me what you got..
Then how about "When it rains it pours" Not the same pictorial presentation but very close meaning.
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  #11  
Old May 15th, 2015, 12:01 PM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

^ Sorry SL ji,
but with due respect, the sense is not maintained in that.

these all are same

Jale pe namak
ek toh Karela upar se neem chada
ek toh bandar upar se daru payo
ek toh dukaal ( akaal ) upar se adhik maas !
ek toh kodh upar se khujali
another nail in the coffin.

btw, the reason I posted other loads and lots of proverbs/sayings which has Hindi-english meaning for the same sense, but have been said in a different way,

'Coz those are the only available and limited stock on the net.

Even if, you tried hard you now, U will not or say,..
will find hardly anymore or many more, which has in Hindi and English the same sense,
and has been said in a diff. way.

You try to list more,. you could hardly find other 7-10 new at the most, not any more.
.

Last edited by Jagmohan; May 15th, 2015 at 12:12 PM.
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Old May 15th, 2015, 12:11 PM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
"When it rains it pours"
That saying is similar to,

William Shakespeare 'When sorrows come, they come not single spies. But in battalions!'

I gujarati, they say,.. પડે છે,.. ત્યારે, સઘળું પડે છે !
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Old May 15th, 2015, 04:14 PM
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
Lot of proverbs/idioms have their equivalent is most languages.

But sometimes it is difficult to find an suitable equivalent.

What is the English equivalent of "Ek to karela upar se neem chadha"?

Please feel free to add your questions/answers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceSeeker View Post
Jagmohan,

Pls dont post cutted-pasted chapters. I guess you REALLY need to learn the ropes



@ Peaceseeker?
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  #14  
Old May 15th, 2015, 09:07 PM
PeaceSeeker PeaceSeeker is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sane Less View Post
Then how about "When it rains it pours" Not the same pictorial presentation but very close meaning.
Ok. More explanation required.
The "karela" proverb is more directed towards an "individual" (or "instance") than a "situation".
Show me more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drsantabajuwala View Post
[b]

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Old May 15th, 2015, 09:43 PM
Jagmohan Jagmohan is offline
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Re: English equivalent of Hindi/vernacular proverbs/idioms

when it rains it pours -

Jab museebatein aati hai, toh charon aur se aati hai.

kudarat jab, laathi vinzna suru karti hai, toh dho daalti hai

[ Indication is towards the Nature/God, of its be-rehemi and ruthlessness ]

========================================

Ek toh Karela upar se neem chada.

Say, if someone is Cruel and devil-like already and govt,. makes him the PM / King, allotting him even more powers !

[ Intensity of evilness is instigated either by his efforts or the human force of our society. No slap from the nature/god is mentioned here. ]


One idiom is indicating Honi / Honaarat the other is for our man-made system - how we do someimes.


Last edited by Jagmohan; May 16th, 2015 at 05:34 AM.
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