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Old March 5th, 2015, 09:43 AM
Aashika Aashika is offline
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Re: Interview of Nirbhaya’s rapist

Sarvi, what was the point of this long article you have pasted here?
I am trying to see what the difference is in the thought process of the criminal and this article (with due respect to the author of the article).

I particularly want to single out these below lines,

" That same day in a conservative estimate, over a thousand rapes would have been committed all over the world. In the USA some 200, in South Africa some 170. In the western cities, the statistics show a high percentage, much higher than in India. Many of those rapes would have been gang rapes. In many cases, the girl or woman would have been killed. Behind each of those statistical figures are painful, heartrending stories. If we knew what is happening at this very moment on this earth – how much pain humans inflict on other humans and on animals – we could not bear it. With so much crime happening everywhere, why is India being singled out and shamed with “another gang rape”, when it actually has only a fraction of the crimes other countries have in relative numbers?"

Shockingly, this was what precisely the rapist was saying too. "whats the big deal. It happens everywhere".

Are you against this documentary going on air because it would show India in a bad, yet, sadly true light?

And to answer why this hue and cry over this particular rape is because of the popularity it has gained (for completely wrong reasons (or is it?), being brutally murdered). Perhaps we care far too much in India to take to streets when we witness something this awful? perhaps we the people have the power to change the rules and get cases on fast track? Perhaps because we continue to read of cases where young girls are abused day in and day out? Perhaps this was a landmark case which brought changes to law? Perhaps the director herself wanted some kind of closure as she herself was a victim of rape? Perhaps these answers are enough for the question the author posed about why this particular rape is exceptional.
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