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tantric_yogi
July 8th, 2003, 05:06 AM
The second Iranian twin died today in a separation operation, a Singapore's Raffles hospital employee said. Laleh Bijani passed away just hours after her sister Ladan died in delicate surgery aimed at separating the 29-year-old Iranian twins who born joined at the head, a nurse involved in the surgery said.

"Everyone upstairs is crying," said a nurse, who was directly involved in the operation. "The second one has died,"' she said. "We treated them like family because they had been here for seven months.''

The operation on 29-year-old Laleh and Ladan Bijani entered a "critical stage" after a team of 28 specialists and 100 assistants pryed apart their tightly packed brain tissue and blood vessels at Singapore's Raffles hospital.

"Despite the best efforts of the medical team, Ladan Bijani passed away," said hospital spokesman Dr Prem Kumar Nair, to cries of grief from hundreds of supporters and friends gathered at the hospital.

"As the separation was coming to a close, a lot of blood was lost," Nair said.


Ladan, the more outspoken twin, had wanted to lead a separate life as a lawyer in her home town of Shiraz, while Laleh said before the operation she wanted to be a journalist in Tehran. They both held law degrees.

Dozens of supporters of the twins broke down and cried in the the hospital, some escorted away by friends.

"I'm very upset," said Singaporean Armila Teo, 48, who was crying in the hospital lobby. "My heart goes out to them. Even if I'm not related, the emotion just overcame me."

After cutting open the pair's joint skull in the hours after the surgery began on Sunday, five neurosurgeons then pried apart the brains millimetre by millimetre in a procedure that had taken much longer than the expected 10 hours.

German doctors turned the Bijanis away in 1996, saying splitting the two could prove fatal. But the women were determined to lead separate lives, and came to Singapore in November to undergo months of tests.

The world-first operation, which doctors warned could kill one or both of the twins, ticked past the 48-hour mark at 10am (1200 AEST), which was the time officials said they had intended to complete the surgery.

"Part of the brain has been dissected but the doctors have yet to reach the base of the brain," a Raffles Hospital official, who did not want to be named, said just before 10 am.

"They (the surgeons) are doing it millimetre by millimetre."

Separating the twins' brains was one of the most critical stages of the operation, with doctors predicting yesterday it would take between eight and 10 hours.

But after starting that stage at 5pm (1900 AEST) yesterday, the procedure had extended into a 17th hour this morning.

Hospital spokesman Prem Kumar Nair told reporters late last night that the twins' brains were more closely enmeshed than doctors originally thought.

"Because they have been fused together for the past 29 years, their brains are very adherent to each other," Nair said.

"The section to separate them is thus taking a long time because the neurosurgeons have to cut through the tissue very carefully, literally millimetre by millimetre."

Nair reported another dangerous complication, with the twins' blood circulation proving to be unstable through the operation.

"We have found that the blood pressure and the pressures in the brain between the two of them tends to fluctuate during the process of the surgery and that is something the team has to take into consideration while they are doing the dissection," Nair said.

The hospital announced another, less important complication, yesterday after doctors encountered unexpected complexities in removing a strip of bone connecting the women's skulls on Sunday.

"It (the procedure) was longer than originally expected because the bones were thick and compact, especially in areas where the two skull bones fused," the hospital said.

One of the most dangerous aspects of the operation was that the twins' brains shared one critical thick vein.

Nair said a replacement procedure involved taking a vein from Ladan's right thigh and grafting it into her head.

Nair said the team of 24 doctors and about 100 medical staff, led by Singapore neurosurgeon Keith Goh, knew there would be unforeseen problems.

Although baby twins joined at the head have been successfully separated, Goh and other medicos had warned that Laleh and Ladan's surgery was more dangerous and complex because of their age.

As they were the first adult twins joined at the head to ever undergo surgery to be separated, the doctors had proceded through unchartered territory.

The sisters had been warned that even if they survived the operation, it could leave them in a vegetative state. But the twins, both law school graduates, had been determined to proceed.

Some of the world's leading surgeons performed the operation. Goh hit the headlines in 2001 when he led a team that successfully separated Nepalese babies Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha in a 97-hour operation.

Benjamin Carson, from the Johns Hopkins Children's Centre in the United States, has separated three sets of conjoined twins and is among the six international experts and 18 local specialists assisting Goh.

AFP

cut/paste
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/07/08/1057430190150.html
:cry: :cry:

Budmaas
July 8th, 2003, 05:14 AM
Maar di na doctorON ne ..................:smash:

tantric_yogi
July 8th, 2003, 05:45 AM
Some of the world's leading surgeons performed the operation. Goh hit the headlines in 2001 when he led a team that successfully separated Nepalese babies Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha in a 97-hour operation.

Benjamin Carson, from the Johns Hopkins Children's Centre in the United States, has separated three sets of conjoined twins and is among the six international experts and 18 local specialists assisting Goh. [/B]

These two were really so determined. They were refused by all hospitals. In Singapore too before doctors accepted the case; twins had to undergo many days of psychological evaluation. Not only once but several times … they were warned that one or none of them may survive. Yet, they WANTED and INSISTED to go through this life threatening procedure just to be able to live normal life.

Sad. Very sad. Brave Muslim women … law graduates! For such disadvantaged women to graduate to be able to practice law … :up: got to salute IRAN and Iranian people! Obviously IRAN is not part of rotten Arab society where they bring daughters, sisters and mothers to local parks and stone them to death … friday fun, Arab style?
.

Doctorlog ka kiya dosh, BudmassbhaI?

Budmaas
July 8th, 2003, 06:14 AM
Originally posted by tantric_yogi
they bring daughters, sisters and mothers to local parks and stone them to death … friday fun, Arab style?
.

Doctorlog ka kiya dosh, BudmassbhaI?

:o
The lines you said about Arabs are totally wrong.
You know . ..German doctors refused to do this operation & told that it would be very hard to get success in this operation.




:rolleyes:

Rahul
July 8th, 2003, 07:27 AM
Originally posted by tantric_yogi


Sad. Very sad. Brave Muslim women … law graduates! For such disadvantaged women to graduate to be able to practice law … :up: got to salute IRAN and Iranian people! Obviously IRAN is not part of rotten Arab society where they bring daughters, sisters and mothers to local parks and stone them to death … friday fun, Arab style?


yaar tuntu pai, what does person braveness needs to do with religion or country, the last same kind of surgery I seen on Discovery separating two eight years boys from Texas, and also seen long back on Discovery health in former Russia (nope I am not discovery health kind of person, I even cant stand seeing that blood stuff, but thanks to my habit of changing channel after every 2nd minute).

Well what you are saying about Iran, is totally different what we hear in USA about them, they r one among axis of evil, and they may be next after N.Korea (if Bush re-elected), I don’t know about their life style, the last big news I heard is Big student protest

nayasavera
July 8th, 2003, 08:17 AM
It's a heart-breaking news. This morning I saw an Indian doctor giving updates on the operation. I was hoping to hear the good news in the evening.

*sigh*

The two sisters expressed the desire to see each other without a mirror. It wouldn't be so. They lived together all their lives but now they may go to two seperate graves.


Tantu baba: I have read this 'stoning-women-for-friday-fun' thingy earlier too in your posts. What exactly do you mean by that ?

While I agree that things in those countries are far from perfect. Things like mandatory burkha (in some countries) and limited freedom of work and movement (in some countries) are abhorable. But stoning women to death for friday fun - well I don't believe it is happening anywhere.

Big-G
July 8th, 2003, 09:10 AM
May God bless their souls.

Rahul
July 8th, 2003, 09:26 AM
Originally posted by Big-G
May God bless their souls.

Yup man, think about it man, they took this bet, becoz they didnt have any choice, kisiney sach hi kaha hey bau

Jako rakhey saiyan maar sakey na koi
Jaki maarey saiyan bacha sakey na koi

Crapistani
July 8th, 2003, 11:49 AM
TWINS ARE DEAD

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/nm/20030708/mdf312594.jpg

Abhi Abhi Khabar Milliii hai kee....

Hospital sources at Raffles Hospital in Singapore said that Ladan Bijani(L) and her conjoined sister Laleh had both died July 8, 2003, after two days of unprecedented, high-risk surgery to separate their heads and brains. Doctors said that 29-year-old Ladan passed away first and a hospital nurse told Reuters that her sister Laleh died a short time later. The conjoined twins from Iran are seen at a news conference in Singapore June 11, 2003.

SOURCE: Yahoo.Com

GpeL
July 8th, 2003, 11:53 AM
Repeat.

http://www.echarcha.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&postid=202169#post202169

Therefore.. punishment is mandatory.


:screw:

Ravi
July 8th, 2003, 11:53 AM
Chalo, aarti utaar dete hai.

http://www.echarcha.com/forum/showthread.php?threadid=14545


[Now, suddenly, people will start blaming doctors :shoot ]

vakil sahib
July 8th, 2003, 02:18 PM
i was really saddened by this(the deaths, not the repeat!). the whole world was rooting for the twins but i suppose it was not to be.
may their souls rest in peace.

echarcha
July 8th, 2003, 02:46 PM
Sad news... These operations are quite risky from what I have read. Very few turn out successful.

tantric_yogi
July 8th, 2003, 06:26 PM
Originally posted by Budmaas

The lines you said about Arabs are totally wrong.
Sorry Bhai Saheb ... treatment of women in that part of the world can be verified … is true. Of course you may also say we (Indians and Pakistanis) are not known for fair treatment either and I will agree to that too.

You know. ..German doctors refused to do this operation & told that it would be very hard to get success in this operation.
Earlier similar team of doctors HAVE successfully separated young Nepalee twins … also jointed at the head. Think it may be because of age? We all are aware that even a minor of the surgeries on little finger can become life threatening or yeh to is about separating brain tissues. Wonder if they died due to surgery? I think may be not. Is it possible that they died due to loss of blood as well as trauma (of more than 40 hours) ... [/B]

Rahulbhai and G'Morning ji ... sorry. Please do allow me.

I think, this is what I was thinking. Iran is the part of the world where women (for own protection?) are not allowed to go out in the public or be seen, drive, curse the face but not even painted finger nail or ever allowed talk to strange men. Young guys belonging to religious police beat up women in public for so much as showing a strand of hair. Religious police cane those old women old enough to be their mother and all this in public. No exaggeration.

And, in such a part of the world ... we have Iran and its people. This is not about religion or politics but about admiration.
We are sad at the death of these two young women, ought to feel joy that they lived a happy and normal life. We ought to be grateful to Iranian people … for letting these two brave women live a normal, natural and cheerful life, inspite of their handicap. It really is true. Gregarious twins LIVED a cheerful life. Graduated from a law school. Talkative twin dreamt of practicing law in Tehran and shy one wants to become an interior decorator in a small town, I think.

World is sad at their death. I am just happy for this pair of young women that they were fortunate enough to be born in a country where they were permitted to dream. Guess … I am just full of admiration for Iranian people and happy for those twins for they lived a short but ordinary life. Thanks be to Iran and its people.

In India ... have you ever been to melas held in villages or small towns? Huge sign declares a live monster. You pay the money and step inside the tent. Lying in the centre of pit is your chained monster. A human being unfortunate to have been been born with physical deffects ... two heads, three arms, one leg, a tailbone or other facial abnormalties.

So ... having seen all that and knwoing how they treat women in Arab world ... I can not help but salute Iranian people! That's all really!

Ravi
July 8th, 2003, 10:26 PM
Very often I find myself in a dilemma as to what we are doing is right or not. On one hand, I feel what was no need to do this operation, and on the other, I think it was neccessary.

I also find myself comparing this incident with Columbia tragedy. :cry: On both occasions, it was not necessary for the crews to risk their life, but they did so neverthless. They had volunteered to undertake the risk.

I can only hope that their sacrifices will help the medical field make further advances and save many more lives which would otherwise be lost. Loosing is better than not participating at all.
In the end, humanity wins, albeit at the cost of a brave few.

The smiling faces of these two ladies delights me, but it hurts to realize that they aren't with us anymore.

tantric_yogi
July 9th, 2003, 03:13 AM
Originally posted by nayasavera
But stoning women to death for friday fun - well I don't believe it is happening anywhere.

Let's rejoice if true but unfortunatly I think this goes on. Please do read me explain for this mention in earlier reply. Not intended to offend.

nayasavera
July 9th, 2003, 04:22 AM
Originally posted by tantric_yogi
Let's rejoice if true but unfortunatly I think this goes on. Please do read me explain for this mention in earlier reply. Not intended to offend.

We agree on one point that anything less than TOTAL GENDER EQUALITY is abhorable - in whatever form it's practised or justified anyhwhere.

Yaar these days such things can't be swept under the carpet. I can recall only one such incident in the last 2 years. One Nigerian court sentenced a woman to death by stoning for adultary. And the whole world was baying for the judge's blood then. The decision was reversed in the superior court.

I just meant that stoning and all is almost non-existent now. There are other forms of discrimination in those parts and we can only pray that they get a better sense.

Aur rahi baat upset/naaraaz hone ki, yaar discussion me bhi naaraz hua jaata hai kyaa? Unka desh unke customs, menu kyaa ? :)

echarcha
July 9th, 2003, 10:14 AM
May their souls rest in peace.

This was already posted here
http://www.echarcha.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=14556&highlight=twins+dead

and I am merging the two threads now.