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echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 11:49 AM
Folks,
Last night we had this dish which is a very traditional Maharashtrian dish. It is also made with some variations by Gujratis. This is a variation on the Marathi Zhunka or Pithla which is made just of ChickPea flour.

Ingredients
4 bell peppers (shimla mirch) - chopped in medium sized pieces
Half oinion - chopped in medium sized pieces
Turmeric - just a small amount
Red Chilli powder - as per taste (hot/mild/mediim)
Dhaniya Jeera poweder (Cumin-Coriander pweder) - one spoon
Garam Masala - just a small amount
Besan (chickpea) flour - about 2 tall glasses full
Cooking oil
Mustard seeds (rai) - small spoonful
Curry Leaves - 3 to 4
Salt - to taste


How to cook
First take a vessel and mix besan (chickpea) flour with small pinches of Dhaniya jeera powder, very small amount of salt and small amounts of Red chilli powder and Garam Masala.
Add some water to this mix and mix well till you get a thick paste.
Keep aside
In another cooking vessel add some oil and heat
Add the curry leaves and mustard seeds when oil is sufficiently hot
Add chopped onions and stir
Add some turmeric
After 2 minutes add chopped bell peppers and stir
Cover with lid and let it cook for about 10 minutes on high flame with ocassional stirring to prevent overheating and burning
When the volume of the onions and bell peppers has become less sprinkle very little salt and cover lid and reduce flame
Next add some red chilli powder, dhaniya jeera powder and garam masala.
Remember that you have added these spice powders in the chickpea paste so dont put excess of these.
Now add the chickpea flour paste into the vessel while stirring constantly to ensure proper distribution
Add some extra water if necessary.
It is important to keep the flame low and stir for some time till the paste and bell peppers are properly mixed up.
Now cover the utensil with a stainless steel dinner plate and put some water on the plate. This allows for steam cooking the vegetable and not cause it to stick to the vessel or burn
Keep a watch every 2-3 minutes and stir so that all parts of the mixture can get proper heat
The chickpea flour takes some time to cook but you cannot hasten cooking by increasing the gas flame.
Within the next 10 minutes your dish is ready!


Enjoy with chapati and pickle as condiment.

PS: It might take you a couple of attempts to get perfect dish, but trust me, its worth it :)

echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 11:57 AM
I have carried it today in my tiffin and will enjoy it once more :)

echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 12:02 PM
This tasty recipe has lots of chickpea flour which leads to flatulence... so be careful ;)

Big-G
October 18th, 2002, 12:52 PM
This sounds good man. I had tried Zunkha after taking recipe from here (given by arya). It was great. Yeh bhi kisi din try karooNga.

by the way....


Originally posted by echarcha
Now cover the utensil with a stainless steel dinner plate and put some water on the plate. This allows for steam cooking the vegetable and not cause it to stick to the vessel or burn


Yaar, paani plate kay oopar daaloge toh vegetables steam kaise hongay??? vegetables toh andar haiN. Or am i getting it wrong? :confused:

echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 01:04 PM
Originally posted by Big-G
This sounds good man. I had tried Zunkha after taking recipe from here (given by arya). It was great. Yeh bhi kisi din try karooNga.

by the way....




Yaar, paani plate kay oopar daaloge toh vegetables steam kaise hongay??? vegetables toh andar haiN. Or am i getting it wrong? :confused:

What happens is that the water on top of plate starts heating up and turns to steam. Dont ask me who this helps the vegetables inside but when you do this, the begetables inside dont burn. Also some water drops form on the inside of the plate.

Can anyone explain the science behind this? I dont the science but do know that this works!

echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 01:05 PM
itni acchi recipe ko :)

Big-G
October 18th, 2002, 01:13 PM
Originally posted by echarcha
What happens is that the water on top of plate starts heating up and turns to steam. Dont ask me who this helps the vegetables inside but when you do this, the begetables inside dont burn. Also some water drops form on the inside of the plate.

Can anyone explain the science behind this? I dont the science but do know that this works!

LOL :D

I know the science behind this. The water on the outside turns to steam and flies away. The droplets on the inside are because of the water in the vegatable/besan getting evaporated first, and then condensing on the plate surface.

(churchill pai... baahar paani daalne se andar nahin pakega yaar :p )

Rated this 5 star ;)

saverewaligadi
October 18th, 2002, 02:13 PM
hai yeh vyanjan.

Maine iska sevan kai baar kiya hain. Aap sahi hain ki iska sevan karne se peat ka vayu ho sakta hain.

Agar besan theek se paka na ho to peat ke vayu ke sang sang doosre din aapko shauchkriya mein bhi apatti aati hain. Mera yeh anubhav raha hain.

Diplomat
October 18th, 2002, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by echarcha
What happens is that the water on top of plate starts heating up and turns to steam. Dont ask me who this helps the vegetables inside but when you do this, the begetables inside dont burn. Also some water drops form on the inside of the plate.

Can anyone explain the science behind this? I dont the science but do know that this works!

Actually, it is a simple form of weight on the plate so that the plate does not rise and let the steam from inside go out. Rasoi technology mein isko "DUM" process kehte hain.

smellyfinger
October 18th, 2002, 02:20 PM
Actually there is some science behind this

1. The extra weight of the water on the plate causes the gaps between plate and vessel to be less. This keeps the moisture in.

2. Keeping the lid cooler (below boiling point of water) ensures that steam on the inside will condense on the plate quicker and drop back into the vegetables, preventing escape. Without water on the top, there is less condensation, meaning more steam, meaning more moisture escapes.

3. you can put a tea bag also in the water in the plate, and you get garma garam chai :D. Parallel processing. Recycling energy.

Big-G
October 18th, 2002, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by smellyfinger
3. you can put a tea bag also in the water in the plate, and you get garma garam chai :D. Parallel processing. Recycling energy.

Better still, attach some pipes to the plate, which will carry the steam to a turbine, which in turn will be attached to a generator.

Your own, thermal power plant :rolleyes:

Diplomat
October 18th, 2002, 02:30 PM
meri awaaz suno!!!!

read my post too!!!!

smellyfinger
October 18th, 2002, 02:41 PM
Haan diplu haan. Toonay sahi kaha bhai. I was typing while you were replying, I guess.

:D

Oye G, tu to ek besan ki sabzi se poora power plant bana rela hai baap. :D

Big-G
October 18th, 2002, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by smellyfinger
:D

Oye G, tu to ek besan ki sabzi se poora power plant bana rela hai baap. :D



ustaad ji.... charcha pai ke rehte, PowerPlant ke saath saath ek Gobar Gas Unit bhi ban jaayega :D


Originally posted by echarcha
This tasty recipe has lots of chickpea flour which leads to flatulence... so be careful ;)

Aur yeh sab kuchh sirf ek besan ki sabzi se :D

smellyfinger
October 18th, 2002, 02:47 PM
Ab merekoo samajh aaya. Akka Mumbai ka power source hai - VT ke paas Zhunka Bakhar ka ishtall. Saala itna Zhunkha banate banate .. poora city ko fulltime bijli milta hai.

echarcha
October 18th, 2002, 03:42 PM
Originally posted by saverewaligadi
hai yeh vyanjan.

Maine iska sevan kai baar kiya hain. Aap sahi hain ki iska sevan karne se peat ka vayu ho sakta hain.

Agar besan theek se paka na ho to peat ke vayu ke sang sang doosre din aapko shauchkriya mein bhi apatti aati hain. Mera yeh anubhav raha hain.

Aap sandas mein jaake aapki sandaas ko dekhte hain kya :clap: ROTFL :clap: :D

Diplomat
October 21st, 2002, 08:38 AM
monitoring your output is a healthy habit :D